Highlights

Verdict Date: The Allahabad High Court is scheduled to announce its verdict on December 19 concerning five petitions related to the Gyanvapi complex dispute in Varanasi.
Decision Reservation: The court had reserved its decision on December 8 after hearing arguments from both parties, and Justice Rohit Ranjan Aggarwal will render the verdict.
Petition Categories: The five petitions include three related to the Varanasi court’s jurisdiction and two challenging the Archaeological Survey of India’s survey order.
1991 Varanasi Case: A pivotal aspect involves the 1991 case filed in Varanasi court, with a significant demand to hand over the disputed premises to Hindus for worship.
Places of Worship Act (1991): The court will determine the applicability of the Places of Worship Act of 1991, raising questions about the Varanasi court’s authority to hear the case.
Key Stakeholders: Arguments have been presented by the UP Sunni Central Waqf Board, Anjuman Masjid Committee, and the Hindu side, reflecting the diverse interests involved.
Historic Precedent: The Muslim side has cited the Deen Mohammed case of 1936, adding historical context to the legal discourse.
ASI Survey: Despite the recent completion of the Archaeological Survey of India’s survey, the report is pending presentation in court, with the survey team requesting additional time.
Implications: The verdict holds significance for religious rights and property disputes in India, potentially shaping the landscape of similar conflicts.
Anticipation: As the date approaches, the Gyanvapi complex dispute remains a focal point of legal scrutiny and communal discourse, drawing attention to the broader implications of the case.

The highly anticipated judgment in the Gyanvapi complex dispute is set to be delivered by the Allahabad High Court on December 19. This legal battle revolves around five petitions, with the court reserving its decision on December 8 after hearing arguments from both sides. Justice Rohit Ranjan Aggarwal, presiding over the single bench, will render the verdict, addressing critical aspects of the case.

The petitions encompass issues related to the maintainability of the 1991 case filed in the Varanasi court, along with challenges against the Archaeological Survey of India’s (ASI) survey order. Notably, three petitions pertain to the Varanasi court’s jurisdiction, with a significant demand to hand over the disputed premises to Hindus for worship.

At the core of the judgment lies the interpretation of the Places of Worship Act of 1991 and its applicability to the Gyanvapi case. The court must determine whether the Varanasi court is authorized to hear the case and if the aforementioned act is applicable. Arguments have been presented by the UP Sunni Central Waqf Board, Anjuman Masjid Committee, and the Hindu side, underscoring the complexity of the legal battle.

A historic precedent from the Deen Mohammed case of 1936 has been cited in court by the Muslim side, adding another layer to the legal discourse. Meanwhile, despite the recent completion of the ASI survey, the report is yet to be presented in court. The survey team has requested additional time for submission, further prolonging the wait for critical insights into the matter.

As the Allahabad High Court prepares to deliver its verdict, the Gyanvapi complex dispute remains a focal point of legal scrutiny and communal discourse, with potential implications for the broader landscape of religious rights and property disputes in India.

Disclaimer:

The information provided in this article is based on the news text sourced from a reliable and reputable platform, indiatoday.in. However, this publication does not officially endorse the accuracy of the information presented. Readers are encouraged to verify facts independently.

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